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The truth about motorcycle operation in New Jersey

It may seem as if riders wear leather and ride big bikes to be cool. However, leather is worn for insulation protection and big bikes are only suitable for experienced drivers. Inexperienced riders who attempt to ride a bike that weighs 700 pounds or more may find that they cannot maneuver through tight turns or even stay upright. There are also several myths related to operating a motorcycle that could compromise rider safety.

First, it is thought that having loud exhaust pipes make it easier for drivers to keep track of where a motorcycle is on the road. However, most of the noise actually goes behind the rider, which means a driver in a vehicle in front of the bike is not going to hear it. Next, it is believed that other drivers will be able to spot a motorcycle when it is on the road. However, riders should never assume that drivers can see their bikes. Instead, good defensive driving tactics and wearing reflective clothing is a great way for motorcycle operators to protect themselves.

Finally, riders may believe that they are safer on streets because they are going at slower speeds. Instead, more accidents occur on streets than on roadways because of the narrow lanes and the tight turns that a rider may have to navigate.

After a motorcycle accident, the accident victim may with to contact a personal injury attorney. He or she may be able to procure compensation from the insurance company of the driver at fault. It may also be possible to get compensation from the driver directly if his or her insurance company will not pay or if there is a gap between what the other driver's policy covers and what the victim is owed.

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